Those kicks were fast as lightning: Kangaroo rats evade deadly snake strikes

first_imgBanner image of a rattlesnake attacking a kangaroo rat in the southwestern U.S. desert courtesy of ninjarat.org. A research team has shown that desert kangaroo rats fend off predatory rattlesnakes through a combination of speedy reaction times, powerful near-vertical leaps, and mid-air, ninja-style kicks.Locating snakes through radio tracking and filming snake-kangaroo rat interactions with high-speed video cameras enabled the team to analyze strike and reaction speed, distance and angle the rats moved to avoid being bitten, and aspects of the impressive maneuverability displayed by most kangaroo rats in the recordings.About 81 percent of recorded snake strikes were accurate, yet the snake actually bit the kangaroo rat in just 47 percent of the strikes and latched on long enough in just 22 percent of strikes to actually kill and eat the kangaroo rat.The slowed-down videos demonstrate the importance of kangaroo rats’ physical features, including long tails and powerful legs, and mid-air maneuverability in escaping predation. A student-led research team from three California universities has shown that desert kangaroo rats frequently avoid predation by rattlesnakes through a combination of speedy reaction times, powerful near-vertical leaps, and mid-air, ninja-style kicks.A desert kangaroo rat in the desert of the southwestern United States leaps over a sidewinder rattlesnake to avoid predation. Image courtesy of the research website, ninjarat.org.The research team tracked free-ranging rattlesnakes using radio telemetry and set up high-speed video cameras to capture potential predatory interactions when tagged snakes took on their ambush postures near active kangaroo rat burrows or foraging kangaroo rats. The researchers recently published their findings on the factors affecting snake predation success and potential advantages of bipedalism among small mammals.Deadly predators and athletic preyBoth sidewinder rattlesnakes (Crotalus cerastes) and desert kangaroo rats (Dipodomys deserti) are nocturnal residents of the deserts of the southwestern United States and Mexico. Rattlesnakes are ambush predators, meaning they sit still for long periods waiting until prey unaware of their presence get close enough. They eat various small mammals, including kangaroo rats, and attack by suddenly and rapidly launching themselves toward their prey and killing it with a venomous bite.Avoiding the stealthy strikes of a hunting rattlesnake at night, therefore, requires exceptional speed and athletic ability. Kangaroo rats have both: they and other bipedal small mammals frequently evade ambush predation by snakes.The seed-eating desert kangaroo rat in a quiet daytime moment. Its exceptional hearing, long tail, and long, powerful legs all contribute to its ability to survive surprise attacks by ambush predators such as rattlesnakes. Image by James Bailey via iNaturalist, CC 4.0.Kangaroo rats can hear the low-frequency sounds produced by the sudden movements of a striking snake or swooping owl. Their long powerful hind legs and strong tendons allow them to make impressive vertical leaps or bound away in any direction.Recent development in high-speed video technology enabled the research team to produce and analyze data on the rapid and unpredictable snake attacks and kangaroo rat responses in the field and to quantify exactly how these small mammals escaped predation. The videos provide an unprecedented view of the maneuvers that kangaroo rats use to defend themselves against a dangerous predator. They were not expecting karate kicks.A high-speed recording of a desert kangaroo rat (Dipodomys deserti) defensively kicking away a sidewinder rattlesnake (Crotalus cerastes) in mid-air. Researchers filmed the free-ranging animals in their desert habitat at night with high-speed cameras using near-IR lights invisible to both species. The video was recorded at 500 frames per second and slowed down here about 30 times. This clip shows the ability of kangaroo rats to avoid venom injection, even when bitten, by using a forceful mid-air kick to dislodge the snake and push it away. Video courtesy of ninjarat.org, where you can find more information and additional videos.Capturing interactions between two cryptic speciesTo film snake-rat interactions in the wild, the researchers first had to find both predator and prey in the dark. The research team tracked the rattlesnakes by embedding tiny radio telemetry tags in free-ranging snakes and setting up video cameras when the snakes approached active kangaroo rat burrows.They marked kangaroo rats with miniature ear tags and a fur dye to distinguish individuals and used variations in fur and shape for the many unmarked rats that they recorded in the videos.They tracked the tagged rattlesnakes each evening. When they found a snake hunting near active kangaroo rat burrows based on the standard ambush position used by the snakes, they positioned a pair of cameras recording at 500 frames per second with a shutter speed of 1/500th of a second, together with four to six infrared lights, about 3 meters (10 feet) from the snake.The filming setup with lights and cameras at night. Recording ambush predators such as rattlesnakes requires patience, assisted by miniature radio-tags, high-speed cameras, and infrared lights that are invisible to both the snakes and the kangaroo rats. Image courtesy of ninjarat.org.“We only use infrared lights that emit a wavelength, which is invisible to both kangaroo rats and rattlesnakes, as well as ourselves,” University of California, Davis, ecology doctoral student Grace Freymiller told Mongabay. Rattlesnakes have infrared-sensing pit organs that allow them to “see” heat, said Freymiller, the lead author of one of the two papers, so the research team selected lights that emitted a wavelength outside the spectrum to which the snakes are sensitive. The recorded interactions therefore took place in complete darkness, with only the cameras able to see what was going on.The researchers connected the cameras to laptop computers via cables that allowed human observers to stay at least 20 meters (66 feet) away from the snake. An observer watched the live video feed on the laptops until the snake either interacted with a kangaroo rat or abandoned its ambush. The video was left running, so that when a snake initiated an attack, the observer triggered a camera, which saved the preceding 10 seconds of footage, giving context to the interaction.The team analyzed several types of the kangaroo rats’ evasive movements to better understand how their physical features, such as their long tails and powerful legs, and the speed and angles of their jumps combined to help them evade predation by the rattlesnakes.The researchers digitize their video recordings to extract data on the animals’ movements, including speed and angles of attack and defense, and build statistical models to analyze the data. Image courtesy of ninjarat.org.Finding and recording snake predation attempts wasn’t easy. Over nearly three months of placing the high-speed cameras to record snakes hunting where the rats were foraging, the researchers recorded 32 strikes: 15 hits in which rattlesnakes contacted and bit kangaroo rats, and 17 misses in which the snakes failed to make physical contact.How to avoid snake strikesWhat they found using the higher-speed video surprised them, as the interaction happens faster than a human eye can detect.According to the research team’s statement, the blink of the human eye lasts about 150 milliseconds. The slowed-down footage showed that the rattlesnakes frequently launched from absolute stillness to reach the kangaroo rats in less than 100 milliseconds. What surprised the researchers was that the kangaroo rats turned out to be even faster, with typical reaction times around 70 milliseconds, and some jumps initiated within 38 milliseconds of a snake starting its strike.These near-vertical jumps of more than six body lengths into the air, reaching a velocity of more than 27 body lengths per second, combined with reacting 3.5 times faster than human response time to visual stimuli, helped the kangaroo rats evade snake strikes.A kangaroo rat demonstrates its massive vertical leap and use of its long tail to reorient itself in mid-air. Video courtesy of ninjarat.org.The recorded kangaroo rats’ movements greatly reduced predation, even from an otherwise deadly predator. The recordings showed that about 81 percent of strikes were accurate, yet the snake actually bit the kangaroo rat in just 47 percent of the strikes. Moreover, in just 22 percent of strikes did the snake actually kill and eat the kangaroo rat.“Kangaroo rats that responded quickly were frequently able to jump clear of the snake completely, leaving the serpent biting nothing but dust,” co-author Rulon Clark, an associate professor of biology at San Diego State University, said in the statement. “But in perhaps the most surprising finding of our research, kangaroo rats that did not react quickly enough to avoid the strike … often were able to avoid being envenomated by reorienting themselves in mid-air and using their massive haunches and feet to kick the snakes away, ninja-style.”Series of images taken from a missed strike (a, on top) and a bite where the kangaroo rat forcibly removed the snake’s fangs (b, on bottom). In the unsuccessful strike, the images correspond to the moment of strike initiation (0 ms), first frame of the kangaroo rat response (32 ms), kangaroo rat’s leap (168 ms), kangaroo rat landing on the snake (496 ms), and the kangaroo rat running away (582 ms). In the bite, the images correspond to strike initiation (0 ms), first contact with kangaroo rat (160 ms), kangaroo rat kicking the snake (246 ms), and the snake being propelled away by the kangaroo rat’s kick (326 ms). Image is Figure 2 of Whitford et. al, (2019), “Determinants of predation success: how to survive an attack from a rattlesnake.”The new, faster video technology made this finding possible.“Our previous work used lower-speed cameras, and although it seemed as though snakes had successfully struck their prey, the movements of the animals at the moment of impact was too blurry to see details,” said Malachi Whitford, a doctoral student at San Diego State University and lead author of the other publication.Their new study using cameras with much higher recording speed and resolution showed that kangaroo rats “not only have record-breaking reaction time, but can also use their long tails to reorient their bodies while jumping, thereby optimally positioning themselves for both defensive kicking and landing on their feet.”In fact, in all of the recordings of these athletic jumps, even those in which the kangaroo rats twisted their bodies or kicked in mid-air, they always managed to reposition themselves to land on their hind feet. That enabled the rats to immediately add an extra jump away from the snake. A kangaroo rat evades a sudden rattlesnake attack from a few inches away by rolling and torquing its body, leaping up, and bounding away. Video courtesy of ninjarat.org.The defensive mid-air kicking was more of a surprise to the researchers.“We had suspected that the kangaroo rats may be kicking the snakes off based on some older footage we had recorded at a lower frame rate (120 frames per second),” Freymiller said, “but we weren’t able to confirm this until we were able to record the interactions at a higher frame rate (500 frames per second). Without the high-speed recording, it would have been impossible for us to tell exactly what was going on, and despite our previous suspicions, we were still very surprised when we saw what was happening!” Kangaroo rats kick-fighting. Desert kangaroo rats are territorial and will use their leaping and mid-air ninja kicks to fight over resources, defending their burrows, food caches, and foraging areas from invaders. The PVC pipe was used as an experimental setup testing the animals’ reaction times. Video courtesy of ninjarat.org.Through the high-speed video recordings, the researchers analyzed strike and reaction speed, distance and angle the rats moved to avoid being bitten, and several aspects of the impressive maneuverability displayed by most of the kangaroo rats in the recordings. Their “kicks, flips, twists, body contortions and other rapid mid-air movements” helped the kangaroo rats not only avoid the snakes’ fangs but also remove them fast enough to avoid their full effect.After seeing some kangaroo rats receive bites yet still jump away and survive, the researchers tested the rodents’ blood to be sure they weren’t physiologically resistant to snake venom, the way some squirrel and opossum species are. They weren’t.“This is the first direct evidence that some prey can remove snakes that have bitten them before lethal envenomation occurs, thereby increasing their likelihood of surviving a bite,” the authors write in their Whitford et. al., (2019) paper. “The duration of fang penetration was drastically reduced in all instances where the kangaroo rats forced the removal of the snake’s fangs.”Freymiller said she wasn’t sure if an algorithm analyzing the video of the rapid and explosive movements could pick out the patterns better than a human researcher could. “No two interactions that we recorded are the same, especially on the kangaroo rat side of the interaction,” she said. “We found that the movements are complex and context-dependent — both the kangaroo rats and the rattlesnakes actively responded to each other, altering their behaviors and movements to try and gain an advantage on the other.”Freymiller said the challenge in obtaining sufficient sample points to create an adequate training data set would currently preclude automating the video analysis, but the growing use of the technology in other studies has piqued the team’s interest.CitationsFreymiller, G. A., Whitford, M. D., Higham, T. E., & Clark, R. W. (2019). Escape dynamics of free-ranging desert kangaroo rats (Rodentia: Heteromyidae) evading rattlesnake strikes. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society. DOI: 10.1093/biolinnean/blz027Whitford, M. D., Freymiller, G. A., Higham, T. E., & Clark, R. W. (2019). Determinants of predation success: how to survive an attack from a rattlesnake. Functional Ecology. DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.13318 Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Sue Palminteri Animal Behavior, Animals, cameras, Deserts, Film, Predators, Research, Rodents, Tagging, Technology, Tracking, Video, Wildtech last_img read more

Audio: Chatty river dolphins in Brazil might help us understand evolution of marine mammal communication

first_imgOn today’s episode of the Mongabay Newscast, we speak with Gabriel Melo-Santos, whose study of Araguaian river dolphins in Brazil has revealed that the species is much chattier than we’d previously known — and could potentially help us better understand the evolution of underwater communication in marine mammals.The Araguaian river dolphin was only described to science in 2014, and there’s a lot we don’t yet know about the freshwater cetacean species. It was believed that the solitary nature of the dolphins meant that they wouldn’t have much use for communication, but Gabriel Melo-Santos led a team of researchers that recorded 20 hours of vocalizations and documented 237 distinct types of sounds made by the dolphins.In this Field Notes segment, Melo-Santos plays some of the recordings he’s made of Araguaian river dolphins, explains how he managed to study the elusive creatures thanks to their fondness for a certain fish market in Brazil, and discusses how the study of Araguaian river dolphin vocalizations could yield insights into how their sea-faring relatives use their own calls to maintain social cohesion. On today’s episode, we speak with Gabriel Melo-Santos, whose study of Araguaian river dolphins in Brazil has revealed that the species is chattier than we’d previously known — and could potentially help us better understand the evolution of underwater communication in marine mammals.Listen here: Article published by Mike Gaworecki Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Bioacoustics, Dolphins, Environment, Freshwater Animals, Mammals, Marine Mammals, Podcast, Rivers, Whales, Wildlife The Araguaian river dolphin was only described to science in 2014, and there’s a lot we don’t yet know about the freshwater cetacean species. It was believed that the solitary nature of the dolphins meant that they wouldn’t have much use for communication, but Gabriel Melo-Santos led a team of researchers that recorded 20 hours of vocalizations and documented 237 distinct types of sounds made by the dolphins.In this Field Notes segment, Melo-Santos plays some of the recordings he’s made of Araguaian river dolphins, explains how he managed to study the elusive creatures thanks to their fondness for a certain fish market in Brazil, and discusses how the study of Araguaian river dolphin vocalizations could yield insights into how their sea-faring relatives use their own calls to maintain social cohesion.Araguaian river dolphins in Mocajuba, Brazil. Photo Credit: Gabriel Melo Alves dos Santos.Here’s this episode’s top news:In Indonesia, a flawed certification scheme lets illegal loggers raze away‘Resisting to exist’: Indigenous women unite against Brazil’s far-right presidentInterest in protecting environment up since Pope’s 2015 encyclicalWould you like to hear how Mongabay grew out of its founder’s childhood adventures in rainforests and a fascination with frogs? Or how a Mongabay editor reacted to meeting one of the world’s last Bornean rhinos? We now offer Insider Content that delivers behind-the-scenes reporting and stories like these from our team. For a small monthly donation, you’ll get exclusive access and support our work in a new way. Visit mongabay.com/insider to learn more and join the growing community of Mongabay readers on the inside track.If you enjoy the Mongabay Newscast, we ask that you please consider becoming a monthly sponsor via our Patreon page, at patreon.com/mongabay. Just a dollar per month will really help us offset the production costs and hosting fees, so if you’re a fan of our audio reports from nature’s frontline, please support the Mongabay Newscast at patreon.com/mongabay.You can subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast on Android, the Google Podcasts app, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, RSS, Castbox, Pocket Casts, and via Spotify. Or listen to all our episodes via the Mongabay website here on the podcast homepage.Gabriel Melo-Santos with an Araguaian river dolphin. Photo by Luiza Helena Pereira.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

La Salle makes quick work of Adamson in UAAP volleyball

first_imgMOST READ Motorcycle taxis ‘illegal’ starting next week — LTFRB board member Lady Eagles turn back Lady Warriors for third straight win Kim Dy unleashed a game-high 15 points while graduating playmaker Kim Fajardo dished out 37 excellent sets for the Lady Spikers, who upped their mark to 4-1.“We just got our confidence back. We lost it after our loss to UP before the team regained its confidence with a win over NU,” said DLSU head coach Ramil de Jesus.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSBreak new groundSPORTSMcGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC returnThe Lady Falcons just simply had no answers for the Lady Spikers’ offensive attacks with only one block to show.Adamson also couldn’t get anything on the other end with Jema Galanza pacing the team with seven points on 28 tries. Prince Harry: ‘No other option’ but to cut royal ties Prince Harry: ‘No other option’ but to cut royal ties Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:00Chief Justice Peralta on upcoming UAAP game: UP has no match against UST01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite The Lady Falcons remained winless, tying University of the East at the bottom of the standings with a 0-5 record.La Salle takes on UE on Sunday before rounding out the first round against Ateneo on March 4.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next View comments Beggar dead in Quezon hit-and-run incidentcenter_img China counts sharp rise in coronavirus cases, 2 in Beijing Marcos monument beside Aquino’s stirs Tarlac town Palace: Crisis over ABS-CBN franchise unlikely Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Riding high after dealing National University its first loss three days ago, defending champion La Salle outclassed Adamson, 25-12, 25-16, 25-15, to tie Ateneo in second place in the UAAP Season 79 women’s volleyball tournament Wednesday at Filoil Flying V Centre in San Juan.ADVERTISEMENT 2 ‘bookies’ bet collectors held in Quezon Taal Volcano continues to emit steam, ash from weak explosions LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

Jeers fuel Cheng in Final Four win over UST

first_imgPanelo: Duterte only wants to emulate strong political will of Marcos Dozens wounded as Iraqi protesters up pressure on government Ai-Ai delas Alas on Jiro Manio: ‘Sana pinahalagahan niya ang naitulong ko’ Canadian military mobilized to help Newfoundland dig out On the edge of America, census begins in a tiny Alaska town MOST READ Palace: Crisis over ABC-CBN franchise unlikely Marcos monument beside Aquino’s stirs Tarlac town La Salle’s Desiree Cheng. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netAs Desiree Cheng started to heat up en route to 11 points while helping De La Salle University brush off University of Santo Tomas, 25-14, 25-20, 24-26, 25-13, in the Final Four, jeers started to rain down on her.Cheng, however, didn’t mind.ADVERTISEMENT Pinays on the front footcenter_img Presidency bid needs ‘deep reflection’ – Sara Duterte LATEST STORIES And as the boos got louder, Cheng reciprocated it by showcasing the swagger usually reserved for the Lady Spikers.“I don’t think that was the swag, but I’ll admit I got caught up in the moment because when you score a point that’s a confidence-booster for you,” said Cheng.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite SpaceX launches, destroys rocket in astronaut escape test “Everybody knows that boos are part of the game, so that’s fine with me and besides I’m used to it,” said Cheng Saturday as the Lady Spikers advanced to its ninth straight UAAP women’s volleyball finals.“I think I’m challenged more than ever whenever opposing fans boo me, and it just pumps me up even more.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSBreak new groundSPORTSMcGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC returnAs Kim Kianna Dy and Mary Joy Baron played their part as La Salle’s opposite and middle hitters, Cheng was slowly punishing UST as the defending champions outside hitter.Cheng wasn’t only hurting the Golden Tigresses from the left flank, she also scored three service aces further driving the point home as a potent scorer for La Salle. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

50th win for Corley

first_img“It was great to score my 50th victory in Jamaica, my second home,” said Demarcus ‘Chop Chop’ Corley on Wednesday night, when he scored an easy unanimous decision in eight rounds, over Jamaica’s Ramel Lewis at the Mico University College campus, on the Wray and Nephew Contender fight card. Judges Laurence Neufville and Ransford Burton scored it 79-73 each, while judge David Dunbar had it 78-74 for Corley. Corey, who is from the USA, is 43 years old, and boasts a 50-28-1 record. He was the Wray and Nephew Welterweight Contender champion last year. Lewis, who went into the fight with a 7-6 record, won the first round, but Corley used his skill and ring-craft to win most of the other rounds. Lewis was in attack mode when the fight started, and scored freely to the head and body. Corley took some good body shots in that round, and obviously made up his mind that he was not going to mix it up with his younger opponent after that. He kept his distance, switched from orthodox to southpaw stance from time to time and piled up points round after round. – L.B.last_img read more

Binnie aiming for top 50 pro ranking

first_imgKINGSTON: Jamaican squash star Chris Binnie is aiming to crack the top 50 of the Professional Squash Association’s (PSA) rankings as he kicks off his fall season next week. Coming off a successful summer, which saw him winning a recording-breaking 8th Caribbean championship and his 8th All-Jamaica title, Binnie is hungry for success in the international arena. The 28-year-old has set a target to move from his current ranking of 74 to the top 50 within the next six months. “The plan is to improve my ranking and I’m aiming to be in the top 50 by next spring; after that, I’m going for the top 30 because I want to prove that Jamaican athletes can be the best in sports where we don’t traditionally compete,” Binnie said. With three PSA titles to his credit, Binnie knows he’ll have to get more wins in order to move up. As a result, his agenda includes an ambitious tournament schedule for the remaining months of 2017. First up is the US Open, which gets under way on October 7 in Philadelphia. From there it’s on to the White Oaks Court Classic Open in Canada, which kicks off on October 11, and then the Chicago Open in mid-October. Then, all being well, the Jamaican number one should be part of the national team which will contest the 2017 World Squash Federation’s Men’s World Team Squash Championship in Marseille, France, from November 27 to December 3. Binnie is quick to credit his sponsors for playing a pivotal role in his rise from 160 in 2015 to his current position in the top 70. The financial support enabled him to travel greater distances and play more tournaments, which has improved his ranking considerably. However, more sponsorship support will be needed for his quest to reach the Top 50. “On the PSA circuit, you improve your rankings by playing more tournaments and winning more matches,” Binnie explained. “I could never have come this far if I didn’t have the support of my sponsors, and now that I am aiming to improve my ranking, I am hoping to get even more support to take Jamaican squash to the next level.”last_img read more

Drone Strike has St Leger coordinates

first_img The derby was run exactly as expected with the surprise package, as track announcer Brian Rickman bellowed at the top of the lane, being DRONE STRIKE. DRONE STRIKE’s surprise was that he hadn’t run in the 10-furlong Governor’s Cup and the derby was only his second race in excess of seven furlongs. The farthest he had gone before was a mile in the 2000 Guineas, a race with extremely fast splits, which, as proven in his previous events, would have been unsettling for his running style. Nevertheless, DRONE STRIKE finished a respectable eighth in the Guineas behind COMMANDER TWO, beaten by only six lengths, two and a quarter behind MARQUESAS, who returned as the derby favourite. Therefore, with no Governor’s Cup form to go on, DRONE STRIKE was overlooked in the betting but proved he was the best stayer in the event from as early as the half-mile when, in one swoop, he went by three horses – COMMANDER TWO, DRUMMER BOY and FAYROUZ – to go in chase of MARQUESAS, who he collared on the turn and ran away from up the lane. Reviewing the derby tape, DRONE STRIKE was literally jumping out of jockey Aaron Chatrie’s hands going past the clubhouse turn and down the backstretch but was kept in check by horses ahead of him and to his outside. Unleashed at the half-mile, it was clear that he had the race won because Shane Ellis, having thought he had slipped the field from the five with MARQUESAS, could hardly believe that a horse was snapping at his heels leaving the three-pole. The derby points of call represent the tale of the tape for the St Leger. MARQUESAS was more than four to five lengths clear of DRONE STRIKE at the half mile but two behind at the two-pole, cut down by a fresher and better stayer, whose sire, SORRENTINO, produced the likes of BIGDADDYKOOL, one of the country’s best distance horses. SURPRISE PACKAGE DRONE STRIKE, who flew in under the radar to bomb rivals in the Jamaica Derby a month ago, is hard to oppose in this afternoon’s 10-furlong St Leger, having exposed his two-turn form in the biggest classic of them all. Two horses went into the June 30 derby with real staying credentials, last year’s Jamaica Two-Year-Old Stakes winner, MARQUESAS, and this season’s Oaks champion, FAYROUZ, only to be both humbled by DRONE STRIKE, who had never before ventured beyond a mile. There will, of course, be talk about ‘a fluke run’ from Patrick Lynch’s gelding. However, those who do are conveniently forgetting that the reclusive trainer had used THE BOMBER to win the 2007 Derby within a month of debuting. Lynch, one of the most patient and secretive trainers at Caymanas Park, knew exactly what he was doing all along with DRONE STRIKE, who sprang a surprise 13-1 victory on his Boxing Day debut, beating EL PROFESORA and FASHIONISTA, horses who returned to score by wide margins in subsequent races. Rather strange equipment changes in subsequent events resulted in DRONE STRIKE not winning another race until derby day when he turned up as barefaced as he had on debut – no blinkers, tongue tie or figure eight – and the rest is history, a 24-1 upset victory, almost doubling his odds when winning on his first outing. DRONE STRIKE now faces almost the same cast he beat a month ago in the Jamaica Derby at 12 furlongs. The St Leger is, of course, a different race on paper, but has nothing new to offer by way of competition – 11 runners from the Derby and four who might not have even qualified for the race itself on earnings. The idea of tactics being revisited by some connections, is hard to take serious, considering the manner in which DRONE STRIKE won the derby from two and a half furlongs out.last_img read more

Chelsea clip Arsenal 3-2

first_img Pedro’s pace had caused Sokratis to panic and Arsenal were punished by the Spaniard soon afterwards, with Alonso racing on to Jorginho’s pass and crossing for Pedro to tuck in with ease. Aubameyang should have equalised, first shooting straight at Kepa Arrizabalaga after Shkodran Mustafi’s fine pass down the right, and then spurning an easier opportunity from point-blank range. Chelsea took advantage. Cesar Azpilicueta lofted the ball down the right channel for Morata and the Spain striker, with one league goal in 15 league appearances since December 26 before this game, turned Mustafi and then tucked the ball under Cech. But the visitors kept creating chances. Iwobi, included ahead of Aaron Ramsey, found Mkhitaryan in plenty of space but the Armenian lifted the ball over. Mkhitaryan made amends after Nacho Monreal nipped in to intercept Ross Barkley’s pass towards Willian. Iwobi ran at Chelsea’s defence, his shot ricocheting back for Mkhitaryan to score. Mkhitaryan turned provider soon afterwards, crossing for Iwobi to fire in from the position where the Armenian and Aubameyang had missed. Other results: Cardiff 0 Newcastle 0; Everton 2 Southampton 1; Leicester 2 Wolves 0; Tottenham 3 Fulham 1; West Ham 1 Bournemouth 2. LONDON, England (AP): Eden Hazard came off the bench to set up a late winning goal by Marcos Alonso as Chelsea beat Arsenal 3-2 in a frenetic London derby yesterday for their second straight win in the Premier League. It is the first time Arsenal have opened a Premier League season with back-to-back losses. They started the season with a 2-0 home loss to Manchester City. Coming off a 3-0 victory at Huddersfield last weekend, Chelsea started rampantly and scored through Spaniards Pedro Rodriguez and Alvaro Morata in the opening 20 minutes. Arsenal missed a string of great chances – Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang shot over from close range with the goal at his mercy – but was level at halftime after goals by Henrikh Mkhitaryan and Alex Iwobi in a five-minute span. Hazard started on the bench again, with Chelsea manager Maurizio Sarri managing the winger’s minutes after his World Cup exertions with Belgium. But he made the difference by racing down the leftwing, cutting into the area and crossing for Alonso to sweep in the winner in the 81st. Arsenal’s attempts to play out from the back against City were ridiculed and there was early cause for embarrassment against Chelsea – the first goal kick had to be retaken as the pass from Petr Cech to Sokratis Papastathopoulos did not leave the area. EASIER OPPORTUNITYlast_img read more

Bernard dedicates win to track team

first_img  Yesterday’s results Group A – St Mary’s College 3 Penwood 3 – St Catherine 2 Excelsior 0 – Haile Selassie 9 Oberlin 0 – Mona 1 Clan Carthy 0 – Ardenne 0 Dunoon 4 Kingston College’s coach Ludlow Bernard has dedicated yesterday’s 4-0 win over arch-rivals Calabar High, in an ISSA/Digicel Group B Manning Cup match, to the school’s track and field team. Calabar have been dominating the ‘Purples’ on the track in recent years and yesterday the footballers from the North Street-based school got a chance to punish their rivals at their Red Hills Road home ground. “This one is definitely for the Kingston College fans, for the track and field fraternity, for the old boys. This is a big one for us,” he told The Gleaner after a comfortable victory over the home team. But despite strolling to victory over their rivals, Bernard was not overly impressed with his team’s display. “These are (KC) players that may have had some difficulty dealing with the situation of playing in Calabar’s backyard. We were a bit too respectful of the opposition, not saying that they shouldn’t be respected but we could have done better,” he said. “I don’t want us to be fooled by the score line. We did not play according to how we wanted to. But I like the response second-half, we dug a little deeper to do better and it was good to see a few people getting on the score sheet,” he commented. Oneeke Allen opened the scoring for the visitors on the stroke of half-time. Treyvon Reid made it 2-0 ten minutes into the second-half when he broke away and lifted the ball over the goalkeeper. Substitute Dwayne Atkinson then came on and sealed the win with a late brace for the group leaders. Kingston College sit atop the group with maximum nine points from three games. However, for Calabar who were losing their second match in three games, coach David Laylor said they lost the plot in the second-half. “We did well in the first-half to keep the discipline but after that the team lost it,” he said. – Kingston High 1 Vauxhall 5 – Kingston Tech 0 JC 4 – Campion 1 Hydel 3 – Tivoli 2 Bridgeport 0 – Greater Portmore 2 St Jago 3 – Innswood v Denham Town (waterlogged field) Group B Group D Group F Group E – St George’s 8 Tarrant 0 – Cedar Grove 0 STATHS 6 – Cumberland 4 Papine 0last_img read more

JOA launches new website

first_img Sports and Values The Jamaica Olympic Association (JOA) has taken another step to enrich the country’s Olympic movement through the revamped and relaunch of its website as it seeks to expose Jamaica’s Olympic legacy. Along with the new look website, the JOA has also partnered with streaming service, StrideVision TV, to provide content that will be streamed on the website from all JOA events, including the Olympic Games. “This reconstruction of our website and the advent of our streaming partners are simply part of the DNA of the new JOA and the aspirations of our members,” President of the JOA, Christopher Samuda said. “We believe in not only being innovatively current, but believe in currency, which, for us, is timeless.” Samuda encourages the public to “interface with us as we link sports with values; as we seek to transform the face of sport development from still life visuals to interactive experiences.” The website, www.joa.org .jm, now boasts features to promote athletes through profiles as well as various sections to educate the public about the member associations and the sporting disciplines they administer. “We wanted to develop a site that would be easier to use and have navigation. Our streaming partners who have come along can now use the site to provide content to the public,” Tedroy Henry, IT manager at the JOA, said. “The website now provides information on what the current (JOA) events are and what the coming events will be as well as a synopsis of all of the events (like the recently concluded Youth Summer Olympic Games) that we have gone to.” Brand developer of StrideVision TV, Shannoy Mathis, is pleased to partner with the JOA. “It is really nice to be working with the JOA to try to get content out to the public and the Diaspora. We will be bringing coverage to people who are not really highlighted,” Mathis said. “We are not only looking to put our content on the website but also looking at other outlets to reach our targeted audience.”last_img read more